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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
and magical ♪ ♪ the happy train's on track ♪ because america is back ♪ yeah! ♪ woo hoo! come on! ♪ - wait, what? [all cheering] - ♪ america is back ♪ america is back - wait, according to that scale, i still have a small wiener! - ♪ america is back - i'm still [bleep] angry! - ♪ back and we're back and we're back ♪ ♪ we're so back, we're so back ♪ ♪ back back back back back ♪ captioning sponsored by comedy central from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the daily show with jon stewart. [ cheers and applause ] >> john: welcome to the daily show. [ cheers and applause ] my name is john oliver. i am still sitting in for jon stewart who has been spending the entire summer at training camp with the new york giants. apparently he's extremely happy and in almost constant pain. our guest tonight tv legend and host of the new show crowd goes wild on fox 1 regis philbin is here. [ cheers and applause ] oh, yes, indeed. we start tonight with the news media. now, personally i get all my news from jon stewart and the daily show. which is why i have absolutel
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
: in fact america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the word. >> we are a 24 hour a day country. we are always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on face book where people post "can't fall asleep. taking my ambien. lights out y'all. and ambien, i got to agree that i have a love/hate thing with you. i'm talking to a doctor about getting off of you. >> you have people that come to you and say i want to get off of this. >> all the time. the majority of the patients i see. >> reporter: not being able to sleep can be a curse, affecting a person's ability to function. research shows sleep aid do work, allowing us to catch much needed zs. is a drug-induced sleep just as good as falling asleep the old-fashioned way. >> a lot of people feel it is real sleep. a lot of people don't feel the sleep quality is good. >> reporter: the doctor points out only a limited number of studies looked at long term effects of chronic use. that is something people don't lose sleep over as they. pop ano
was a really good friend. next. all throughout high school we hung out. >> heroin's increasing toll on america. and later...? >> in three more years, star trek is going to be celebrating its golden anniversary.,, [ female announcer ] new nature valley soft-baked oatmeal squares. hearty oatmeal now softly baked with a drizzle of cinnamon. it's a brand-new take on a morning classic. soft-baked oatmeal squares. new from nature valley. ♪ you have to let me know [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >> osgood: no parents want to believe their child could be hooked on heroin. so it's always a shocking discovery when they find out. it does happen every day and sometimes in places where you would least expect it. our colleagues at "48 hours" have spent the last few months investigating heroin addiction in a small town in illinois. our cover story is reported now by maureen maher. >> it's thursday afternoon in the levy chicago suburb of naperville, illinois. >> i will be home later.
, it is a scandal. but if it came up in the of the context that you raised first, it's just part of life in america. >> ladies and gentlemen, on that note, floyd has kindly agreed to sign his book. again, critics have given it an incredible review, and it's just a breathtaking book. i've read and it's breathtaking. i would strongly urge you to have your book signed by floyd but if you could just remain seated for about 20 seconds. my last question to float, could you tell us if the society for challenge into getting and the supreme court questioning? [laughter] >> certainly much more relaxing. >> actually. on outlook know, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in thanking one of the most brilliant scholars and lawyers that this nation has had that has impacted many of our lives on a regular basis. thank you. [applause] >> you are watching tv on c-span2. 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> up next, booktv's peter slen into his office and one. this weaknesses concludes with military historian antony beevor followed by victorian era expert judith flanders. antony beevor talked ab
oliver. i am still in for jon stewart who is scourge competing to be america's next top model. oh, no, they voted him out! they voted him-- don't listen to them, jon. you're beautiful on the inside! and there is no shame being more catalog than editorial. that's a fact. my guest tonight the writer, director, and staffer a very funny new movie "in a world" lake bell will be here. very good, very good. but we begin tonight with breaking news. >> the big chill between the u.s. and russia may be heading for the deep freeze. president obama has officially canceled his one-on-one meeting with vladimir putin. >> john: canceled? wow, that's a big diplomatic slap in the face, a dip move, if you will. ( laughter ) although if the president really wanted to hurt putin he would have said he was coming and just stood him up. trust me, that hurts a lot more. or if you wanted to be more passive aggressive the president could have said let's meet somewhere that's not technically in russia like, i don't know, moscow airport. ( cheers and applause ) look, we all know-- we all know why this meeting was
is going to be able to sell cricket to america. >> you never heard of gorgey thompson. >> john: i do. she knows you and i've been asking her about you. >> john: whoa! after the show we'll talk. john: she's fantastic. she was on the news for years. >> ten years. john: good luck selling cricket. >> do you play cricket. john: you know what? everything in britain is class based. so cricket is for posh people. >> really? john: that's not for the likes of me. i know i sound like it. >> what sport did you play as a kid growing up. >> john: soccer. religiously. >> it's a big deal. it's getting bigger and bigger in america. >> john: i want to be a soccer player more than anything else. this was very much plan-b. >> how in the world did this happen? you wanted to play soccer and here you are. >> john: it was a complete lack of physical ability. and that's all. >> you couldn't kick the ball. john: are you a frustrated athlete as well? >> i used to play in bronx park. john: play what? baseball. john: classic. a little football. yeah, sure. >> john: you're a yankee fan. yes, i am. (a few people in the
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
#mymarchdc. we want to hear your stories. >> it appears america is still not color blind. new study by tpeer research center, among blacks, jumps to 79% african-americans lag behind many whites 14% margin, 7 in 10 blacks are treated less fairly by police and courts. also this morning 50 years ago, voting rights a huge issue and remain so today. federal government suing state of texas over new id law which is discriminatory. >> texas is the only state that is discriminating in redistricting. in june, supreme court ruled to remove the -- to seek pre-clearance from the department of justice before making changes to election and redistricting laws. justice department is using a different part of the act in the texas case. now to the violent death of a community activist in d.c. >> police say someone shot timothy dawkins where he lived. the 24 year old studied to become a preacher. he had plans to run for ant commission e commissioner. >> he had an old soul. we traveled with kids to tennessee for training. we more examples especially black men. we lost out here. >> police don't have a suspect or
at "good morning america" one of the most hot dog resingsists. they would call me and say things. i would say good morning america. i did like the switch board. good morning america. they would say, was that a nazi that you had on today? i would say, yeah. you know, they would say how could you have a nazi on television? listen, i don't book the show, first of all, and if they're all in argentina, you have to fly them here. >> john: but they're blond, blue eyed. >> brand completely aggravate me about where is joan london. how the hell do i know? i'm answering phones. do i know where joan london is? >> john: you coul a receptionis. >> i got fired from that job. >> a beinger the chance of getting married is the same chance as being kidnapped by terrorists. to me they're the same thing. >> that wasn't humidity, that was the 80s. >> the hairdos i've been subjected to, oh my god. >> john: i bet they all looked great. >> where is that from? >> john: one of our staff found it. >> and the shiny jacket. >> john: it was from the 80s. i think one of the best moments are current network. i thought wa
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
of america's most original and influential... depp: the sixties begin with a shot. [ gunshot ] the civil rights movement intensifies. the war in vietnam gets bigger and bldier. man: president johnson, meanwhile, let it be known that the fbi is closely watching all anti-war activity. depp: the youth movement catches fire, making everyone over 30 a cultural enemy. the days of ricky nelson and "leave it to beaver" are over. i have nothing against kissing. but these friends of yours, penny, they want to kiss you all night. depp: the establishment resists, but a genuine counter-culture is growing. for some, psychedelics like lsd open the doors of perception. the doors: ♪ the gate is straight ♪ deep and wide, break on through ♪ depp: a massive cultural earthquake is splitting the country wide open. and out of the crack steps a band called the doors. man: name? robby krieger. age? 22 years old. occupation? guitar. name? john densmore. age? 23. occupation? percussionist. name? raymond daniel manzarek. age? born 2/12/39. occupation? musician, organist. name? uh, jim. occupation? um... depp:
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
stains. ♪ >>> america just can't compete in this connected world without a super fast information highway. that's why the government has set aside billions to upgrade the nation's internet service. >> but abc's david kerley found $1 million wasted in a single closet in west virginia on the washington watch dog beat. [ modem handshaking ] >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: the to spread broadband the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. but take a look at this -- these boxes stacked up in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers, you paid for them $20,000 each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. $1.25 million in this closet gathering dust for nearly three years now. enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned other spendin
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
.s. assets, and flatt tells cnbc there continues to be a lot of investment opportunity in america. flatt says he's bullish on the u.s. because housing, retail and manufacturing are all making a comeback, and he sees possibilities in the shale gas revolution. flatt also mentioned he's looking for value plays in europe and emerging markets. it's always fascinating to know how billionaires are investing *their money. insider monkey reveals warren buffett and others are buying shares of davita. the company owns kidney dialysis centers. billionairs are also bullish on sirius satellite radio company verisign. another popular stock with 1-percenters is an internet registry services company. and billionairs are also big on credit card stock visa. investors are keeping their eyes on priceline. the stock is closing in on a milestone: $1,000 a share. in its latest earnings, priceline notes "tremendous momentum" going forward. strength in europe helped revenues. noodles and company, which went public earlier this summer, is trading lower after its first set of earnings failed to increase investor appet
for your ice ballet. come on, come on, now. is there nothing else that led america to this. >> president obama is cancelling his meeting with russia's president putin over tensions becausest n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> john: yes, that is clearly the only reason. it's-- it's always a good idea to pad out with what you really want to say with self-righteous human rights stuff like, "kimberly, we need a break. i don't like your stance on chine and tibetan monks and your boobs are weirding me out." if we want snowden back all we need to do is convince vladimir putin that snowden is gay. that away wayhe'llob a plane into u.s. custody faster than a definitely not homoerotic team of elastic clad men. that quick. actually, russia is not only global leadership story we're dealing with tonight which brins us to our new segment... indeed. now, we've already dealt with russia, so let's see where our magical dploab will take us next egypt! egypt. i just lift egypt. i'm not-- i'm not used to guns. ( laughter ) as the situation in egypt continues to devolve, the u.s. like a polar bear on a hastily
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >>a. >> >> >> meteorologist: well, we're going to update quite a bit of weather around the united states as well as mexico. i want to take you to california. we're still looking at some intense rain towards the south. unfortunately, it's not getting over here towards the west where we need it, where the wildfires are burning, but for california, nevada, as well as parts of montana as well you're seeing quite a bit of rain, and flash flooding is going to be a major issue for y
to silicon valley companies like that, especially google, america's most popular sport and the world's most powerful internet company. could be an interesting conversation. >> absolutely. thanks so much, christine. >> it's got to happen, it's the future. eventually everything will wind up having some digital things. we'll be watching two screens at once. we know t it's a question of how. christine romans we know what she's doing today, little investment decisions. >>> when we come back, climate change, another massive issue, they say we're causing it, is it real? according to an international panel of scientists, grave consequences could be coming. >>> also coming up is senator ted cruz eyeing the white house in 2016? a lot of people are questioning whether he can legally run and a lot of people are putting that to rest. >>> also why the texas lawmaker tells cnn we are in the middle of silly season in politics a head. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
a lot of inconsistencinconsistenc. in the americas, things are going pretty well as they are in northern europe. in southern europe, not as well. in japan, where cisco was doing very well last year, now they have some tough comparisons. also in the rest of asia, it is just a mixed bag. china is an area where cisco continues to have trouble. ceo john chambers said on the conference call cisco is committed to delivering on the financial targets they set, like gross margins being above 60%, like earnings growing faster than revenue in most quarters, well managed businesses do that, he said. and therefore that necessitates the making of the cuts so they are able to roll with the punches and the changes in this environment. he also said that cisco is taking too long to make decisions. he's going to cut out some layers that are slowing cisco down. but the stock tumbled at one point more than 10% after hours. if that is indeed where the stock opens later today, it will be back to the levels where it was back in may. guys, back to you. >> here is a quick look at cisco shares in germany, off by s
. and deutsche telekom warning of a profit slowdown in 2013 and looking toward north america for growth. where are the opportunities for this particular sector. we'll talk about that at 11:50 central european time. hope you had your pens and pencils ready. you can find us on e-mail as usual, worldwide@cnbc.com. and you can as per usual find us on twitter. but, again, just coming back to one of the stories breaking on our wires, we're hearing that there has been a quake in western japan. no tsunami warning issued according to dow jones news wires quoting media and magnitude of 2.3 is the magnitude of this quake in western japan. again, no tsunami warning issued. >>> let's move on, though, because china's trading activity in july has given new hope that mainland growth is stabilizing. exports climbed by around 5%. imports surging almost 11%. both figures were a lot better than analysts estimates. the rebound comes as a surprise given china's lackluster trade performance in the past couple of months. that's after authorities clamped down on illegal cash transfers disguised as trade deals. joining
on political trips with him in the united states into south and latin america which was very unusual for women in her generation. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a young girl. she was very proud of the fact that she spoke fluent french and german which he perfected while she was at the content making the best of a bad situation which would become her mantra in life. when she married this was a way to escape both the boisterous mess of the children and perhaps some of the upset over the weaknesses in her marriage and in some ways perhaps was also a form of birth control because of worst the catholic church the catholic church would not have allowed any artificial contraception. >> host: she thought mine was enough. >> guest: she thought mine was enough and in later years she was on the merv griffin show in the early 70's and he brought up that her son bobby and his wife ethel had 11. rose said well if i had known it was a competition i might've had more than nine. >> host: i think it was a bit of a competition. there was one trip where they want to rush on that was unusual for w
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states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
by 3.4%. it was hit by natural catastrophes, bad weather essentially, in north america. but also in europe. net profit missing expectations for the second quarter, and companies also pretty cautious about its outlook. last but not least, i want to show you what is happening in the currency space. sterling dollar at a two-month high, sitting at 155.78. getting closer and closer to that 156 level. this is on the back of better -- much stronger than expected retail sales for the month of july. certainly benefitting from that heat wave we have been seeing in the uk. euro dollar pretty resilient at 132.82, back below the 133 level. and dollar yen seeing a little bit of softness at 98.07. this is because the finance minister in japan pretty much quashed hopes of that cut in the corporate tax rate and this is what the markets had been hoping for. so we are seeing some yen strength. and on the back of that, we are seeing declines, pretty big ones, actually, in the nikkei 225. back over to you guys. >> thanks very much, carolin. becky, are you still looking? >> looking for some of these.
. that is the precursor to what is today macy's. >>> america's farming industry going through a major transition and that could open up bigger opportunities for individuals to invest in farm land. here now to tell us about the risks and rewards about farm land investing is john taylor, at u.s. trust. thank you for coming in today. >> thank you for having me. >> we should set the stage a little bit for why we're at this position. why you might need investors to come in to what used to be family farms. a lot more expensive to be a family farmer and have to be able to have a much bigger land parcel, correct? >> that's right. if you look at the most recent usda report, based on the census they did in 2007, you have farmers who are 65 and older and another 32% 55 and 65, so you kind of add it all up. >> 65% of the farmers. >> 65% of farmers are 5 ye5 yea and older. that's in transition over the next 10, 15 years. you need the next generation of america's farmers on the land. >> is it tougher to get younger people these days to do this? >> in a lot of ways, kids went off to college and they may have g
's happening. >> right? it's happening in america. a sad commentary. >> you know what, i saw it on andrew's face. >> depressing. >> why? we have al accomplished so much. >> depressing. >> look at the deficit reduction ha has occurred over the last three years. take it forward. it's 4 trillion over ten years. 4 trillion over ten years. >> you like it. jimmy likes it. yoep i don't understand it. >> the process is ugly. at the end of the day, we actually accomplished something. >> it's good, jimmy? >> 1.4 trillion when bush left office? today 643 billion. that's the number. >> is that good? i think it's fantastic. we should get below 500 billion. should put us where we were before the bush -- >> joe. >> i don't think the white house nodes to unsettle markets any more than they are unsettled. lock at the economy,ist very weak. a lot of underlying weak inside in the economy. why do we need this? there ought to be a negotiation, a discussion. we ought to have a chance to avoid the disaster let's go back to two years ago, i was luxuriously sitting on nan tuvenlth i had to leave to fly back to ne
. their time. it was bank of america's time before and now it is one of the moments when i look back at my own career and i realize that i had a choice, goldman sachs coming out of harvard law or paul weiss. i took goldman, but it is a paul weiss moment. law firm. i'm going law firm. >> you covered a lot of this when you talked to jamie here on the very floor a few weeks ago. >> yes. >> take a look at this bite. >> this company did great through the crisis, and we trade around the world and trade tr trillions of dollars everyday. we are a good company with flaws. >> you are used past tense. >> yes, there is some compliance and some mortgage and some industry-wide and some unique to us, ap when nd when we looked ae said they were accurate complaints. so we acknowledge the faults and we will fix them. we are not denying it, and we will fix them and make the regulators happy with what we are doing. >> look, a lot of blame to go around and a lot of people hate the bankers, and do you read the store ri and say, boy, i feel bad for jpmorgan and dimon, wow, what a shame. no, you don't. they are big t
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